fbpx
Carefully Planting Seeds

Carefully Planting Seeds

The youngest girls of the Marta y Maria home had agriculture class yesterday. They were introduced to hydroponics, which they were taught is a word that comes from the Greek meaning “work in water.” Approximately 15 girls ranging in ages from 9-12 planted cucumbers, cabbage and lettuce using this new technique.

Testing the texture of watered peat moss

Testing the texture of watered peat moss

“Which part of the plant is the mouth?”, asked the teacher, Luis.

“The root!!!!” They all screamed. “And the kitchen?” “The leaves!” they responded enthusiastically.

In three groups the girls learned the materials, germination time, growth time and transplanting schedule for each crop. They used small straws to deposit each seed carefully in the peat moss, and will be independently responsible for aerating existing lettuce on a daily basis and keeping track of when to transplant.

Learning hydroponics is incredibly beneficial to the girls not only because it is an alternative technique that requires no land or soil and very little space. It also is a useful method in areas with poor soil, like parts of Jalapa. Even the littlest residents wanted to see this novel practice- and the food it produces for their home. With additional funding secured, it wouldn’t be beyond the realm of possibility to install greenhouse systems utilising lighting systems (such as https://agron.io/products/gavita-pro-1650e-led-ml) to ensure a sustainable, and effective method of producing food all year round.

One of the little ones curious about hydroponics

One of the little ones curious about hydroponics

One of the little ones joining in

One of the little ones joining in